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The 5 Steps to Training A New Technique

Most of the videos I post online are from my main Youtube channel which focusses quite heavily on BJJ, no gi jiu-jitsu, MMA and other forms of grappling.

But what a lot of people don’t know is that I also have a second youtube channel called ‘Self Defense Tutorials‘ which – as the title might imply – focuses more on self defense and martial arts training.

Here is one of the videos from that second channel talking about the 5 levels of training you need to make a technique functional and something you can rely on in a real situation.

Ultimately it doesn’t matter if that technique is a triangle choke, a throw, a right cross or a double stick striking combo; the same 5 levels of training are required again and again.

Understanding and implementing these 5 different ways of training will definitely speed up the learning process regardless of whether your goal is to get your BJJ black belt, fight in an MMA match, or just walk the streets with increased confidence.

Check out the video below…

I wrote a more in depth article about these 5 levels on selfdefensetutorials.com called How to Make Sure Your Martial Art Will Work on the Street.

You should check out that article if you want more details, but if you just want a quick reference, here are the steps for internalising a martial arts technique and making it functional.

THE 5 LEVELS OF TRAINING A NEW MARTIAL ARTS TECHNIQUE Solo Training Partner Training with Low Resistance Partner Training with Higher Resistance Contested Situational Sparring with a Partner Partner Sparring with Many Different Techniques

It’s all explained in the video above, with lots of examples from different martial arts!

The post The 5 Steps to Training A New Technique appeared first on Grapplearts.

Every Martial Art Consists of These 3 Things…

I’m primarily known as a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt, but the reality is that I’ve trained in a lot of other martial arts too.

These other martial arts include Combat Submission Wrestling, Kajukenbo Karate, Boxing, Wing Chun, Judo, Muay Thai, Hung Gar, Pekiti Tirsia Kali, Hsing I, Northern Shaolin, Maphalindo Silat, Capoeira, Tai Chi, Western Fencing, Freestyle Wrestling, Jun Fan/JKD, Shootwrestling, and Inosanto-Lacoste Kali and more…

Obviously there are a lot of differences between the techniques used in these different martial arts, including the way they attack and defend, whether they strike or not, how they strike, how they grapple, etc.

But in addition to the differences in the technique used, there are other differences in these martial arts as well.  And that’s because each of these martial arts consists of three individual components: techniques, training equipment, and training methods.

This insight was shared with me by one of my martial arts mentors and gurus Dan Inosanto, and it’s useful because it helps you identify the different things you can beg, borrow, or steal from martial arts other than your own!

In the video below I break down the 3 components of every single martial art in a lot more detail and using lots of specific examples.  Check it out and tell me what you think in the comments below

 

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A Triangle Choke Escape that Requires Almost No Training…

Years ago I came back from an Indonesian Silat training camp led by Dan Inosanto.

I showed up at BJJ class the next day and was telling a few guys about how much I had enjoyed the training.

One guy with a slightly smartass tone asked me, “How would a Silat guy escape from my triangle choke then?”

It turns out that there IS a very effective, super high percentage Silat escape to the triangle.  And I show it in this video below.

I don’t care if you’re going up against a 250 lb killer black belt with the world’s best triangle choke: if you do this one technique for real you’ll get out 99% of the time.  (The bad news is that you’ll probably also go to prison, but that’s a whole other story.)

Aside from the humour value, the real reason I made this video is because it’s super relevant to self-defense.

We’ve always got to remember that at its core, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a MARTIAL ART.  Despite whatever fitness benefits, camraderie, or challenge BJJ provides you’ve always got to keep at least one eye focused using your skills to protect yourself or your loved ones in a bad situation.

The post A Triangle Choke Escape that Requires Almost No Training… appeared first on Grapplearts.

BJJ Self Defense Part 3: The Street Guard

If you’ve been reading my emails and training in grappling then, by this point, you’re going to be quite familiar with the guard. In some ways it’s the iconic BJJ position. But do you know WHY it’s such an integral part of BJJ? Why do we focus on this position so much? And why would […]